Towie’s Joey Turner insists ‘I’m 7.5 stone, happy & healthy’ after concerned fans were left worried by pictures of him

Towie’s Joey Turner insists ‘I’m 7.5 stone, happy & healthy’ after concerned fans were left worried by pictures of him

10/18/2021

JOEY Turner has insisted he is happy and healthy as he responds to concern about his weight.

The former Towie star denied he is suffering from an eating disorder in an exclusive interview, telling The Sun: “I can’t help that I am skinny. I am not going to apologise to anyone.”


Joey, 20,  sparked worry as he appeared slimmer than usual in recent Instagram posts, but he tells us he’s always been “tall and skinny” and plans to stay that way.

Addressing his weight, he explains: “The thing is I have always had a long thin frame, I am 5ft 11ins  so I am quite tall and I have always had a long frame. 

“Maybe I have lost weight, but not because I am starving myself. 

“I weigh seven and half stone, but I don’t weigh myself. I don’t care about how much I weigh. I am skinny, I can’t help that I am skinny. I am not going to apologise to anyone.”

I am not really a foodie, that’s not me being anorexic, I just don’t care to participate in gluttony.

Joey believes he has a healthy diet and on an average day he eats a bowl of Special K, a salad for lunch and sushi for dinner. When he goes out he enjoys vodka with water. 

He admits: “I don’t eat loads. I am not really a foodie, that’s not me being anorexic, I just don’t care to participate in gluttony.”

Supportive family

He tells us that his friends and family are aware of his eating habits and although his mum does tell him he’s skinny, she’s not worried about him, saying: “She knows me, she knows my medical history, she knows my metabolism and she knows my mindset.”

The fashion lover quit Towie in May of this year and is now studying fashion design at university in London. 

Fans think he’s appearance has changed dramatically since being on the slow, but Joey says it’s only natural over time and believes that a lot of the comments are “disguising hatred with a helping hand.”

He explains: “When I was on Towie, I started when I was 17. I hadn’t even finished puberty at that point. 

“Everyone comes into themselves, I was still young. Nobody looks the same from 17- 20. I am at a pivotal point in my life where I am going to change. If I started the show when I was 23 and I’m now 27, then that is a bit different.”

Joey also questions the double standards in society, saying:  “We live in a generation where everyone is preaching about body positivity, but does that only apply to bigger people?”

Life after Towie

He also says he’s now more free to post what he wants – without having to worry about the reputation of the show. 

The star is aware of how his posts might come across, but argues: “I do understand their point of view, but I am not on TV anymore. I don’t have the responsibility to anyone. I am a 20 year old student, I just want to live my life and post the things I want to post without having people telling me about myself.”

Joey has no intention to censor his posts and vows to continue embracing his body. 

He says: “To put it bluntly – I can’t help being skinny. I am happy, healthy and have supportive people around me.”

THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF BEING UNDERWEIGHT

DOCTORS and healthcare professionals use BMI to check if a person's weight is deemed healthy.

A normal BMI is considered to be between 18.5 and 24.9, but anything below 18.5 can set alarm bells ringing.

It suggests your weight is too low, and can be an indication of an eating disorder.

To check if you're underweight, you can use the NHS BMI online calculator.

The NHS warns, being underweight is not good for your health.

It can cause nutritional deficiencies, and lead to you lacking vital nutrients, calcium to keep your bones strong, for example.

Without enough calcium, you're at increased risk of osteoporosis.

If you're lacking iron, you can develop anaemia, which can leave you feeling drained and very tired.

Being underweight can also weaken your immune system, making you more susceptible to colds and viruses.

And women who are underweight can encounter fertility problems, if their periods stop.

If your low weight is caused by your diet, the NHS recommends switching to a healthy, balanced diet.

It is advised to avoid high calorie food and to try and gain weight gradually.

If you're underweight, or concerned about a loved one, speak to a GP or practice nurse to get help and advice.

To find out more, visit the NHS website here.

 

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