Led Zeppelin: Jimmy Page pays tribute to ‘HEROIC’ John Bonham on 40th anniversary of death

Led Zeppelin: Jimmy Page pays tribute to ‘HEROIC’ John Bonham on 40th anniversary of death

09/25/2020

It was 40 years ago today that Led Zeppelin’s John Bonham suddenly passed away. The 32-year-old drummer had had a heavy night of 40 shots of vodka, before tragically choking on his own sick. Now his bandmate Jimmy Page has paid tribute to one of rock’s greatest drummers of all time.

The 76-year-old posted Led Zeppelin’s first album cover on his Instagram account.

Aside from today being the 40th anniversary of Bonham’s death, it’s also the 52nd anniversary of the recording of the band’s debut album.

Page began with some fond memories from 1968 with Led Zeppelin before paying tribute to Bonham at the end.

The guitarist wrote: “Today heralds the inception of the epic Led Zeppelin I album.”

Page continued: “The moment whereby I would be able to manifest the sounds and layers I had heard in my head and also prove my status as a producer.⁣

“The group went to Studio No.1, Olympic Studios, 117 Church Road, Barnes, London, SW13, having extensively rehearsed the material for Led Zeppelin I at my house in Pangbourne and we had had the opportunity to perform a good percentage of that material during a few concerts in Scandinavia and the UK to experience our music in a live situation under the clandestine cloak of the Yardbirds.

“In those days, the studio time was scattered and limited over a few days in September and October, dictated by Olympic’s availability.⁣

⁣”Thus, with the aid of my old friend Glyn John’s masterful engineering, at 11pm on Wednesday 25th September 1968, we began our recordings and embarked upon committing this eclectic powerhouse to tape.⁣”

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Today heralds the inception of the epic Led Zeppelin I album: the moment whereby I would be able to manifest the sounds and layers I had heard in my head and also prove my status as a producer.⁣ ⁣ The group went to Studio No.1, Olympic Studios, 117 Church Road, Barnes, London, SW13, having extensively rehearsed the material for Led Zeppelin I at my house in Pangbourne and we had had the opportunity to perform a good percentage of that material during a few concerts in Scandinavia and the UK to experience our music in a live situation under the clandestine cloak of the Yardbirds. In those days, the studio time was scattered and limited over a few days in September and October, dictated by Olympic’s availability.⁣ ⁣ Thus, with the aid of my old friend Glyn John’s masterful engineering, at 11pm on Wednesday 25th September 1968, we began our recordings and embarked upon committing this eclectic powerhouse to tape.⁣ ⁣ Much has been speculated about the initial recordings, so I thought it would be useful to show the worksheet from RAK that gives the dates and times that we were scheduled initially to go in. It makes fascinating reading. The opening track of Led Zeppelin I, Good Times Bad Times, changed drumming forever with the glorious technique of John Bonham. Sadly, this day is 40 years since his passing. He left a heroic musical legacy.

A post shared byJimmy Page (@jimmypage) on

The 76-year-old added: “⁣Much has been speculated about the initial recordings, so I thought it would be useful to show the worksheet from RAK that gives the dates and times that we were scheduled initially to go in.

“It makes fascinating reading.”

Paying tribute to Bonham, Page wrote: “The opening track of Led Zeppelin I, Good Times Bad Times, changed drumming forever with the glorious technique of John Bonham.

“Sadly, this day is 40 years since his passing. He left a heroic musical legacy.”

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Following Bonham’s death, Led Zeppelin released a statement on December 4, 1980.

Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones had decided to disband out of respect for their drummer.

Led Zeppelin wrote: “We wish it to be known that the loss of our dear friend and the deep respect we have for his family, together with the sense of undivided harmony felt by ourselves and our manager, have led us to decide that we could not continue as we were.”

Of course, Led Zeppelin have reunited over the years since.

Four times in fact, in 1985 (for Live Aid), 1988, 1995 and 2007. John’s son Jason Bonham played the drums on the latter three reunions.

Sadly, Led Zeppelin haven’t reunited since, with Page most recently saying it’s unlikely.

He told the BBC this summer: “It doesn’t look as though there’s anything in the future, unfortunately.

“We’re talking about a concert that was gigantic at the time, but that was 2007: time passes, y’know?”

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