Prince Charles and Camilla toast Robert Burns

Prince Charles and Camilla toast Robert Burns

01/25/2021

Sláinte! Prince Charles and Camilla share video to toast Robert Burns as they read poems to celebrate Burns Night

  • Charles and Camilla have shared video messages to celebrate Burns Night today
  • The couple both read poems by the Scottish Bard in videos to mark the holiday
  • Charles, 72, read the New Year’s Eve classic Auld Lang Syne, while Camilla, 73, read ‘My Heart’s in The Highlands, which she said is one of her favourite poems 

Prince Charles and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall have shared messages to celebrate Burns Night.

The Duke and Duchess of Rothesay, as they are known by in Scotland, both read poems by Robert Burns to mark the holiday celebrating his life.

Charles, 72, read the New Year’s Eve classic Auld Lang Syne, while Camilla, 73, read  ‘My Heart’s in The Highlands, which she said is one of her favourite poems.  

The Duke and Duchess of Rothesay, as they are known by in Scotland, both read poems by Robert Burns to mark the holiday celebrating his life. Camillia is pictured


Charles (pictured), 72, read the New Year’s Eve classic Auld Lang Syne, while Camilla, 73, read ‘My Heart’s in The Highlands, which she said is one of her favourite poems.

Camilla sported a charcoal grey suit and with a cream pussy bow shirt and dazzling silver broach, while she kept her hair blonde carefully coiffed in pristine bob.

The royal kept a gentle make-up natural look with a layer of foundation and dark eye-make-up, while remaining jewellery-free.

Meanwhile, the heir to the throne sported a grey suit with his signature patterned tie, a powder blue shirt and a silk pocket square as he read the first to verses of the famous poem.

After finishing the poem Charles said ‘Sláinte,’ a Gaelic word meaning ‘health’ and a common toast in Scotland.

Camilla sported a charcoal grey suit and with a cream pussy bow shirt and dazzling silver broach, while she kept her hair blonde carefully coiffed in pristine bob.

It comes Prince Charles was branded ‘atrociously hypocritical and entitled’ by a royal biographer, who said he looks older than his 94-year-old mother

He then takes a sip from a silver cup and smiles at the camera. 

The celebration, which marks the life and poetry of Scottish poet Robert Burns, usually sees the nation come together to the soundtrack of blasting bagpipes as they enjoy a meal of haggis, neeps and tatties while drinking drams of whisky.

Charles and Camilla couple have been staying at Clarence House in London for the majority of the pandemic.

It comes Prince Charles was branded ‘atrociously hypocritical and entitled’ by a royal biographer, who said he looks older than his 94-year-old mother.

Clive Irving has spoken to Vanity Fair and claimed Prince Charles (pictured), 72, is ‘atrociously hypocritical and entitled’

Clive Irving, author of the new biography The Last Queen, has launched a scathing critique of the future king, 72 – adding that if he does succeed Her Majesty, there’s a real risk ‘the monarchy will go over a cliff very fast.’

Speaking to Vanity Fair about one of the more ‘serious problems’ he see with Charles, the author explained: ‘One problem is that he doesn’t look like an invigorating generational shift, does he? That’s what would be needed, something that reinvigorates and sends a sense that they’ve understood the modern world. 

‘In some ways, Charles looks older than the queen….that’s his deliberate and chosen style, like a younger brother of the queen rather than a son.’

He also worries that the royal has run The Duchy of Cornwall solo, away from the Royal Family, for so long, that his actions may be indicative of the way he will operate if he were to take to the throne. 

Who was Robert Burns?  

Robert Burns was born 25th January 1759 and died 21st July 1796 and was widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland.

He was a high-ranking member of the Freemasons and much of his popularity is due to him being seen as farmer’s son who could speak to the common man.

But he also led a varied social life which exposed him to high society.

His poetry often used small subjects to express big ideas, as a result he is often thought of as a pioneer of the Romantic movement. 

He was a source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism after his death, and has a national day named after him on the 25th January each year.

At New Year, his poem ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is still sung to this day.

For 200 years his birthday has been celebrated with suppers in his honour. 

However, he’s become more controversial in recent years, as people have questioned his personal life.

The poet Liz Lochhead outed Robert Burns as a sex pest, highlighting a 1788 letter written to Bob Ainslie in which Burns implies he raped his pregnant girlfriend Jean Armour.

He bragged of giving his lover a ‘thundering scalade [a military attack breaching defences] that electrified the very marrow of her bones’, and said he ‘f****d her until she rejoiced’.

Lochhead described his letter as a ‘disgraceful sexual boast’.

‘[It] seemed very like a rape of his heavily pregnant girlfriend. It’s very, very Weinsteinian’, she said.

‘Not only did Burns make Weinsteinian claims in his correspondence, his poetry abounds with physical violence against women’, writes Daniel Cook, senior lecturer in English at the University of Dundee in The Conversation.

‘Not published until after his death, Merry Muses of Caledonia is stuffed with the bawdiest songs you’re ever likely to read’, he writes.

However, Dr Cook says these works can help us to reconsider human concerns.

‘After Weinstein, the time is right to reevaluate how we respond to literary traditions’, he writes.

‘Rather than using literature (or private correspondence) to out so-called sex pests, though, we can use it as a vehicle for understanding the long history of sex pesting.’

 

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