Prince Charles admits he bought a house in Wales '40 years too late'

Prince Charles admits he bought a house in Wales '40 years too late'

09/01/2021

Prince Charles admits he bought a house in Wales ’40 years too late’ but it was ‘difficult to find the right place’ – and says owning property there is an ‘important part’ of holding his title

  • Prince of Wales made the comments in an interview on BBC Radio 4 on Saturday
  • Charles, who is Duchy of Cornwall, bought Llwynywermod estate back in 2007
  • Says it’s been ‘a wonderful opportunity, at last, to have somewhere in Wales’ 

Prince Charles has admitted he bought a house in Wales ‘probably 40 years too late’ and claimed owning property in the country is an ‘important part’ of holding his title.

The Duchy of Cornwall, 72, bought the £1.2 million Llwynywermod estate in Camarthenshire, close to Llanymddyfri, in 2007 after years spent trying to find ‘the right place’.

He and the Duchess of Cornwall tend to spend a couple of weeks a year at the secluded and fully sustainable three-bedroom farmhouse. There are also two adjoining cottages, which sleep six and four respectively, in a courtyard which are available for holiday let.

Speaking to Poet Laureate Simon Armitage on BBC Radio 4 at the weekend, Charles added that he enjoys spending time in the country and stomping around the Brecon Beacons, especially during the winter months. 

Prince Charles has admitted he bought a house in Wales ‘probably 40 years too late’ and claimed owning property in the country is an ‘important part’ of holding his title (pictured with the Duchess of Cornwall on Tuesday in Aberdeenshire)

The Duchy of Cornwall, 72, bought the £1.2 million Llwynywermod estate in Camarthenshire, close to Llanymddyfri, in 2007 after years spent trying to find ‘the right place’

‘I now, at last, have somewhere in Wales to base myself, from time to time,’ he said. 

‘Rather 40 years too late, probably. But it’s been a wonderful opportunity, at last, to have somewhere in Wales. I come whenever I can… I’ve always felt that it’s an important part of holding this particular title. 

‘It took me years to establish somewhere, it wasn’t through want of trying but it was difficult to find the right place.

‘I used to go to different other houses which was very kind of people to lend them for a week or something, but it wasn’t the same thing obviously until finally we found this, which has been a Godsend really.’

Charles added that part of the joy of owning the home has been getting to know some of the local people, adding that there are some ‘wonderful characters’ who are ‘very special’. 

Photographs released in 2008 of the stunning farmhouse reveal a simple but yet chic interior, with a duck egg blue and cream colour scheme 

‘There’s always one trying to get me to buy his farm,’ he joked, putting on his best Welsh accent. ‘[He says] “you must buy my farm” – he’s a lovely character, we do have a good laugh.’

He told how over the years he has collected some ‘marvellous’ Welsh objects and quilts which he’s kitted the house out with so it feels ‘incredibly cosy’. 

The grounds of the estate have been a ‘labour of love’ to try to ‘bring back to life’, Charles said.

‘I’ve tried to plant many more trees and generally love it back to life again, it was a bit battered,’ he explained.

‘There was an old estate here with a house that now is a ruin; I’m trying to grow things up it, apart from anything else it might hold it upright for a bit longer, but it also had an original old park so I’ve been trying to replant some of that, but it’s all been split up years ago.’

One of the grandest rooms in the property, which was refurbished after the royal couple bought it in 2007, is the dining hall, which can seat more than 16 diners (pictured) 

Asked where his love of the natural world came from, Charles said he’s had a passion for nature from an early age, cultivated by his grandmother, the Queen Mother.

‘I’ve always loved the countryside, I’ve always adored being outside all the time, as I got older I took more and more interest in that sort of thing. For me an essential part of life is to have that connection to the world outside,’ he said.

‘My grandmother used to encourage me to look at things and observe.’

He recalled how he and Princess Anne used to have a vegetable patch in a border in the gardens of Buckingham Palace, where they had great fun ‘trying to grow tomatoes rather unsuccessfully’.

‘There was a wonderful head gardener at Buckingham Palace, he was called Mr Nutbeam rather splendidly, he helped us with the little garden we had,’ Charles said.

‘There was always a wonderful head gardener at Balmoral, he’s still going, an absolute genius… I have particular memories of being in my grandmother’s garden at Royal Lodge… I had great fun there, the head gardener grew melons, they were exceptionally delicious.’   

During the interview, Charles took Simon through a series of hay meadows that surround the former farm, pointing out the trees that have been planted since he took over the property, including the maple trees used to line the aisle of Westminster Abbey for Prince William’s wedding to Kate Middleton. 

Inside Prince Charles’ £1.2 million Welsh bolthole: Stone cottage features pared-back decor and a stunning vaulted dining hall 

Photographs reveal the simple yet stunning £1.2 million Welsh bolthole owned by the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall. 

Llwynywermod in Llandovery features a beautiful stone cottage which Charles recently fled to as he privately mourned the loss of his father Prince Philip.   

Two properties on the estate are available to rent for holidaymakers, with a week’s stay at North Range or West Range costing up to £3,195 depending on the time of year.

Images shared by the couple shortly after they renovated the farmhouse in 2008 show its pared back interiors and simple yet stunning decor, including a beautiful vaulted dining hall. 

One of the guest bedrooms in the stunning £1.2 million Welsh home where Prince Charles went to stay after the death of his father Prince Philip 

Builders renovating the home in 2008 used sustainable products for the makeover and Camilla chose the colour scheme of duck egg blue, off whites and terracotta (pictured, the vaulted dining hall)

The home features a luxurious hallway complete with open beams, stable doors and a Welsh slate fireplace complete with Royal crest (pictured) 

Builders renovating the home used sustainable products for the makeover and Camilla chose the colour scheme of duck egg blue, off whites and terracotta.

The home features a luxurious hallway complete with open beams, stable doors and a Welsh slate fireplace complete with Royal crest.

Meanwhile giveaways as to the identity of the owners of the Welsh property are scattered throughout the home, including the eco-washing powder on the kitchen draining board and the carbon-friendly heating system.

The decor is austere – no frills with bare floors, traditional Welsh weavings on the walls and local pottery on the dresser.

There is believed to be no TV or DVD player in sight in the main house – instead there are ample books on local folklore and guides to local walks across the rolling countryside (pictured, the main reception room)  

The decor is austere – no frills with bare floors, traditional Welsh weavings on the walls and local pottery on the dresser (pictured, one of the spare bedrooms in the house) 

Meanwhile the simple cream colour-scheme also extends to the royal bathrooms, which features exposed wood beams and white panelling (pictured) 

Despite its simple decor, some elements of the home still have the grandeur of a royal estate (pictured, a large Cathedral style window in the dining hall) 

There is believed to be no TV or DVD player in sight in the main house – instead there are ample books on local folklore and guides to local walks across the rolling countryside.

And while there’s no royal garden, the property has its own 192-acre organic farm.

The biggest clue to the identity of the owners of the house is the three feathers crest of the Prince of Wales carved into Welsh slate above the huge fireplace.

The village is known for its peace and quiet, with the nearest shop is a mile away along with a Chinese takeaway and a fish and chip shop. 

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