Did the clocks change last night?

Did the clocks change last night?

10/31/2021

Daylight saving time: Why do the clocks go forward?

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Daylight savings has been used for more than one hundred years in the UK and various other countries to make sure we get the most out of the dwindling daylight hours that the winter months bring. The date varies across the world for different countries, but the UK always sets the clocks back on the last weekend of October.

Did the clocks go back last night?

Yes – the clocks went back at 2am this morning, October 31.

This means the UK got an extra hour in bed, as the clocks went back by one hour to 1am.

The clocks have reverted to Greenwich Mean Time, as they do every winter.

When do the clocks change again?

The change marks the end of British summertime, as winter sets in until March 2022.

The clocks will go forward in the early hours of March 27, heralding the start of the summer.

Between now and then, we will have the shortest day of the year, also known as the winter solstice, on December 21.

Daylight hours will last a mere seven hours and 49 minutes on the date just before Christmas, when the days will slowly begin to get longer again.

Why do we have daylight savings?

There are a number of reasons we change the clocks in the UK – and the case is the same in other parts of the world.

The idea was originally brought in to use in 1916 to save energy, as it gave workers an extra hour of daylight in the morning, making it more productive for work.

Ideas surrounding why we need daylight savings have changed in the 105 years since it was first implemented, with many questioning why we need to bother with it in this day and age.

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Critics have claimed the darker evenings make it unsafe for children to walk home from school, as well as the argument that it saves energy is now redundant, as modern society uses energy regardless of the time in the day or night.

There’s also the argument that changing the clocks can disrupt peoples circadian rhythms, resulting in tiredness and inconvenience.

However, there are many still in favour of changing the clocks twice a year.

One of the aims of DST is to make sure that people’s active hours coincide with daylight hours so that less artificial light is needed, which is more of a concern in places not close to the equator.

A German analysis of 44 studies on energy use and DST found a positive relationship between latitude and energy savings.

Longer evenings made by springing the clock forward in March have been found to have positive effects on peoples wellbeing.

It is argued that an extra hour of daylight in the summer gives people more time to enjoy the outdoors.

The tourism industry also benefits from DST, with longer evenings encouraging people to shop and eat out, boosting local economies.

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